City Council Minutes 5-16-17 2017-06-07T13:22:59+00:00

TREMONTON CITY CORPORATION
CITY COUNCIL MEETING

May 16, 2017

Members Present:
Diana Doutre
Lyle Holmgren – excused
Jeff Reese
Bret Rohde
Lyle Vance
Roger Fridal, Mayor
Shawn Warnke, City Manager
Linsey Nessen, City Recorder

CITY COUNCIL WORKSHOP

Mayor Fridal called the May 16, 2017 City Council Workshop to order at 6:00 p.m. The meeting was held in the City Council Meeting Room at 102 South Tremont Street, Tremonton, Utah. Those in attendance were Mayor Fridal, Councilmembers Doutre, Reese, Rohde, and Vance, City Manager Warnke, and City Recorder Nessen. The following Department Heads were also present: Parks and Recreation Director Marc Christensen, Public Works Director Paul Fulgham, and Police Chief David Nance. Also in attendance were: City Engineer Chris Breinholt, Emergency Management Coordinator Jim Hess (arrived at 6:27 a.m.), and Finance Director Curtis Roberts. Councilmember Holmgren was excused.

Mayor Fridal welcomed everyone in attendance including delegates from GBS Benefits.

The following items were discussed out of order.

1. Review of agenda items on the 7:00 p.m. Council Meeting:

The Council reviewed the May 16, 2017 Agenda with the following items being discussed in more detail:

Res. No. 17-18 Cooperative Agreement with Utah Division of Forestry, Fire, and State Lands (FFSL). Emergency Management Coordinator Hess said this is a cooperative agreement with FFSL and the City, which has an annual payment/in-kind of $5,124. If the fire is not contained in the initial attack, the State will come in and manage the fire. The Fire Department does an annual wildland refresher training and up to 50% of the in-kind can be covered by the training. There are other projects that can count as an in-kind match.

If the Fire Department does a big project that exceeds the annual amount, the excess can be carried over for up to three years. Hours that residents put in count toward the in-kind match as well.

Res. No. 17-19 Contract for Election Services. Recorder Nessen stated this is the same way the City has handled elections in the past and the amount is about the same. Box Elder County notified Recorder Nessen that the price with increase dramatically in two years. They will need to replace the electronic computers and go back to paper ballots and scanners. The price is $1,900 per election, there could be a Primary and a General Election.

2. Health Insurance Renewals for Tremonton City Employees – Mark Johnson, GBS Benefits, Inc.

Mark Johnson with GBS stated the City went with CIGNA last year because of high increases. The plan is a level funded plan that has some components of a self-funded plan such as claims data. Mr. Johnson noted the trend has decreased slightly over the last several years. It is currently trending at a 9.2% increase for Utah.

Mr. Johnson reviewed the claims data and noted it showed the traditional plan paid out 102% in expenses compared to the premiums paid while the high deductible plan paid out 86% compared to premiums. The total loss ratio for the two plans combined is 97%.

The original renewal from Cigna came in at 16.82% increase but GBS negotiated it down to 10.79% after it went out to bid. To make the high deductible plan more enticing, the traditional plan deductible was raised $500 to $1,500, which brought the renewal to a 9.56% increase. The dental plan with Cigna came in with a 5.71% increase and GBS was able to negotiate it down to 1.39%. Lincoln Financial came in with a 7.41% increase for basic life and 10% increase for long term disability. The City has vision insurance through EyeMed and it came back with no increase this year.

GBS will continue to receive claims data and will meet with Manager Warnke and Recorder Nessen to go over the information throughout the year. There was discussion about educating employees more about high deductible plans. The City currently contributes into employee’s Health Savings Accounts (HSA). Mr. Johnson noted the City can also set up Health Reimbursement Accounts (HRA) for those employees enrolled in Medicare who can’t contribute to an HSA.

Manager Warnke explained the City usually pays 90% of the premium for medical, dental, and vision insurance. The City pays 100% of the basic life, accidental death and dismemberment, and dependent life insurance policies. There is a cafeteria plan provided, which the City pays 100% of the administrative fees, with a limit of $5,000 annually for daycare and $2,550 for health reimbursement. Employees pay 100% for voluntary products.

Rob Ferguson with GBS noted they service over 1,200 cities, several school districts and counties. GBS has a lot of governmental experience. The amount Tremonton contributes to employee HSA’s is comparable to what other cities pay but would be generous compared to the commercial market. Most people want to stay in the traditional plan. The City has a high amount that is still using traditional. There could be some education. Most people are better off with an HSA, however, there are 15% of the population that is better off with the traditional plan. The more education available, the more people that join the HSA plan.

3. Discussion of the Secondary Water System Capital Facilities Plan Overview along with implementing and funding of the aforementioned Water System – City Staff

Engineer Breinholt said a reason for constructing a secondary water system is that water rights are likely to be restricted.

4. Discussion of Capital Projects for the 2018 Budget and other matters pertaining to the adopting of the Final Budget for Fiscal Year 2018 – City Staff

This item was not discussed at this time.

Motion by Councilmember Doutre to move into closed session. Motion seconded by Councilmember Reese. Vote: Councilmember Doutre – aye, Councilmember Reese – aye, Councilmember Rohde – aye, Councilmember Vance – aye. Motion approved.

The Council moved into closed session at 6:44 p.m.

5. CLOSED SESSION:

a. Strategy session to discuss the purchase of real property when public discussion of the transaction would disclose the appraisal or estimated value of the property under consideration or prevent the public body from completing the transaction on the best possible terms.; and/or
b. Strategy session to discuss the character, professional competence or physical or mental health of an individual; and/or
c. Strategy sessions to discuss pending or reasonably imminent litigation

Motion by Councilmember Vance to return to open session. Motion seconded by Councilmember Reese. Vote: Councilmember Doutre – aye, Councilmember Reese – aye, Councilmember Rohde – aye, Councilmember Vance – aye. Motion approved.

The Council returned to open session at 6:59 p.m.

The meeting adjourned at 7:00 p.m. by consensus of the Council.

CITY COUNCIL MEETING

Mayor Fridal called the May 16, 2017 City Council Meeting to order at 7:04 p.m. The meeting was held in the Tremonton City Council Meeting Room at 102 South Tremont Street, Tremonton, Utah. Those in attendance were Mayor Fridal, Councilmembers Doutre, Reese, Rohde, and Vance, City Manager Warnke, and City Recorder Nessen. The following Department Heads were also present: Parks and Recreation Director Marc Christensen, Public Works Director Paul Fulgham, and Police Chief David Nance. Also in attendance were: City Engineer Chris Breinholt, Emergency Management Coordinator Jim Hess, and Finance Director Curtis Roberts. Councilmember Holmgren was excused.

1. Opening Ceremony:

Mayor Fridal informed the audience that he had received no written or oral request to participate in the Opening Ceremony. He asked anyone who may be offended by listening to a prayer to step out into the lobby for this portion of the meeting. The prayer was offered by Finance Director Roberts and the Pledge of Allegiance was led by Engineer Breinholt.

2. Introduction of guests:

Mayor Fridal welcomed DeLynne Porter and Cheryl Theus from Paws Enforcing Justice, Mike Weibel and Kevin Christensen from the Bear River Health Department.

3. Approval of Agenda:

Motion by Councilmember Doutre to approve the agenda of May 16, 2017. Motion seconded by Councilmember Vance. Vote: Councilmember Doutre – aye, Councilmember Reese – aye, Councilmember Rohde – aye, Councilmember Vance – aye. Motion approved.

4. Approval of minutes – May 2, 2017

Motion by Councilmember Reese to approve the minutes of May 2, 2017. Motion seconded by Councilmember Rohde. Vote: Councilmember Doutre – aye, Councilmember Reese – aye, Councilmember Rohde – aye, Councilmember Vance – aye. Motion approved.

5. Public comments: Comments limited to three minutes.

Kevin Christensen from Bear River Health Department (BRHD) said they have partnered with Community Partnered Mobile Dental Clinic. They will be at the BRHD located at 440 West 600 North, Tremonton, from June 19-23, 2017. There are eligibility requirements for the $30 exam, x-ray, cleanings, sealants, and others. It was a great event last year. Mr. Christensen asked to put up flyers at the Civic Center. They must provide income to show they qualify and are a U.S. citizen and Utah resident.

Jim Hess spoke in his capacity as Emergency Management Coordinator for the City. He explained that Box Elder and Cache County have met the requirements for the Public Assistance Program to help with damage to public infrastructure such as sewer and roads. The requirements were not met for the individual assistance program which would offer low interest loans to individuals to help repair personal property. The City drains were damaged so they will not receive that funding to help with repairs but there may be other grants that can help with the project to replace the pipes.

Manager Warnke said Engineer Breinholt is working on the cost estimates for the project. The City is working with Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) to have them pay the cost of the pipes and the City will pay the remainder. Coordinator Hess said the City could apply for mitigation funds if they come available. The mitigation expert with the State said they do not know if funds will be available.

6. Presentation & Discussion:

a. Friend of Public Health Award Presented to Jim Hess, Emergency Manager – Mike Weibel, Bear River Health Department

Mike Weibel thanked the Council for giving him time to speak tonight. The Bear River Board of Health (which is the governing body of the Bear River Health Department) recognizes a few people in the community who are friends of public health. Jim Hess was granted the award but didn’t receive it last week due to being deployed in Preston, Idaho for an exercise as part of a strike team. Mr. Weibel was part of a strike team to set up a medical needs shelter and Mr. Hess was bringing up the Blue Med tent. The Blue Med tent is basically a portable field hospital owned by the State. One of the Blue Med tents is located in Tremonton. The State had times when they could not pay Mr. Hess to go out but he chose to go anyway without pay a number of times. Mr. Hess has trained the Bear River Health Department (BRHD) medical reserve on how to set up the Blue Med tent. It takes a few hours to set up and a few to take down and is a wonderful asset.

They are working to get it renamed to the Mobile Field Hospital. Mr. Hess said it is a 25 bed portable hospital contained in 2 tents that are 20’ x 30’ and 20’ x 40’. It is self-contained with a generator and an HVAC system in each tent to provide heat or air conditioning. The Utah Department of Health (UDOH) owns four tents located in St. George, Price, Tremonton, and the UDOH office in Salt Lake City. As a member of the EMS strike team, Mr. Hess has been able to train Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) members. The Blue Med tent was set up at Box Elder County Fairgrounds for a Preparedness Fair. CERT members and the Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) helped put up the tent. Tremonton and St. George are the only locations that have expanded to allow volunteers to assist with the Blue Med Tents. It is currently stored in a trailer at Bear River Valley Hospital.

Mr. Weibel said the exercise in Idaho proved the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC) can be utilized between states to provide assistance. Mr. Weibel noted that Mr. Hess is a tremendous friend of public health. He is also a captain at the fire department at Orbital ATK, a Firefighter/Advanced EMT with Tremonton City Fire Department, and the Emergency Management Coordinator for Tremonton City where he coordinates a variety of emergency preparedness efforts including CERT training. Mr. Hess is a northern region leader for the UDOH EMS strike teams.

Mr. Hess has been an invaluable partner with BRHD and the MRC. He has actively participated in meetings and trainings. He provides expert analysis and evaluation to further health medical response capabilities throughout northern Utah. Mr. Hess has single handedly trained MRC leaders in set up, use, and demobilization of the Blue Med tent. He has been instrumental in helping ensure the Health Department has the necessary credentials in place so nurses can get annual CPR certifications. For these reasons and many more, UDOH would like to present Mr. Hess with the award.

b. “Paws Enforcing Justice” Event – DeLynne Porter and Cheryl Theus

DeLynne Porter thanked the Council for all they do. There was a need for an additional K-9 dog in the City. Ms. Porter and Ms. Theus started a crusade to raise and maintain funds for K-9 dogs in the area. The goal is to raise $25K in the hope that it will help fund a vehicle for the dog, an additional dog, and training for the dog. There is a fundraising event planned for June 17. Councilmember Doutre said the grocery store asks if you would like to donate a dollar toward Paws Enforcing Justice. Ms. Porter noted they need to sell tickets for the event. There will be lots of events for kids at minimal charges including face painting and games. There will be singing, K-9 demonstrations, and characters from Comi-Con. There will be imperial guards and storm troopers in attendance. Organizations that include law enforcement and military will donate time and training.

The event will be held in the Fine Arts Building at Box Elder Fairgrounds on June 17. Lunch will be available to purchase. Ms. Theus said the building will have over 60 vendors. Jan Rhodes, Fair Board President, told Ms. Theus that the event on June 17 will have more than the fair has excluding rides. They are trying to recruit 100 volunteers to help. Dinner will be catered that evening by Texas Roadhouse. The tickets are $20 per meal with $10 coming back to the cause. Ms. Porter and Ms. Theus asked the Council to help spread the word and get tickets sold. They would like to set up at the parks during games to get the word out. The event was founded by West Liberty Foods and has several sponsors including McDonalds and ShopKo.

There are flyers out and banners will be put up at the fairgrounds tomorrow. It is on the City website, Facebook, and a flyer has gone out with City water bills. The dinner tickets can be purchased on the City’s website with a credit card. The Leader is doing four stories and matching funds for advertising for up to eight businesses. After the cost of the ad is paid, the remainder will go to this fund. They will be researching grants to help the community as well.

7. New Council Business:

a. Discussion and consideration of approving the April Warrant Register

Motion by Councilmember Rohde to approve the Warrant Register for April. Motion seconded by Councilmember Vance. Vote: Councilmember Doutre – aye, Councilmember Reese – aye, Councilmember Rohde – aye, Councilmember Vance – aye. Motion approved.

b. Discussion and consideration of adopting Resolution No. 17-17 selecting health insurance carriers and defining the City’s Contribution for health insurance employee benefits for the 2017-2018 Fiscal Year

Motion by Councilmember Reese to adopt Resolution No. 17-17. Motion seconded by Councilmember Doutre. Roll Call Vote: Councilmember Doutre – aye, Councilmember Reese – aye, Councilmember Rohde – abstain, Councilmember Vance – aye. Motion approved.

c. Discussion and consideration of adopting Resolution No. 17-18 approving a Cooperative Agreement between the Utah Division of Forestry, Fire, and State Lands and Tremonton City

Motion by Councilmember Vance to approve Resolution No. 17-18. Motion seconded by Councilmember Doutre. Roll Call Vote: Councilmember Doutre – aye, Councilmember Reese – aye, Councilmember Rohde – aye, Councilmember Vance – aye. Motion approved.

d. Discussion and consideration of adopting Resolution No. 17-19 approving a contract for election services between Box Elder County and Tremonton City Corporation

Motion by Councilmember Rohde to adopt Resolution No. 17-19 to approve a contract between Box Elder County and Tremonton City for the election. Motion seconded by Councilmember Reese. Roll Call Vote: Councilmember Doutre – aye, Councilmember Reese – aye, Councilmember Rohde – aye, Councilmember Vance – aye. Motion approved.

8. Continuance (if needed) from the Work Session or Commencing the Discussion of:

a. Discussion of the Secondary Water System Capital Facilities Plan Overview along with implementing and funding of the aforementioned Water System – City Staff

Engineer Breinholt noted Service Area 1 and 2 are the easiest to do right now and 3, 4, and 5 have the most amount of homes and can save the most amount of water. There are currently 2300 water connections. Director Fulgham said the study has not addressed impact fees for secondary water at this time. Councilmember Rohde said the Council needs more information so they can determine whether to do the whole system at once or a little at a time.

Engineer Breinholt said the City needs to construct secondary water for the following reasons:

• New water rights are likely to be restricted
• New sources will have substantial costs to obtain rights
• Remove demand from culinary system
• Extend life and capacity of culinary system
• Need additional culinary water now
• Secondary water does not need to be treated
• No storage needed (except on parts of Radio Hill)

The majority of culinary water use (two-thirds) comes in July and August. Secondary water would reduce that usage from wells and springs during that time. If the City does not put in secondary water, additional storage will be required in 13-15 years and line capacity would need to be extended.

Engineer Breinholt has created twelve service areas that can be built in a modular fashion. Most areas will pump directly out of the canal. One canal share will irrigate 2.67 residential developed acres. Each service area shows the construction costs to install the lines and states the water saved. The total cost to construct the complete system is $13,600,000 outside what developers would have to construct.

There will be additional costs to buy shares. The share cost for current development is $1.3M and the share cost for future development is $2M. The amounts are based on $3K per share. Director Fulgham noted that some of the future development have water shares. Bear River Canal Company has a lease pool to lease shares yearly. The City’s extra shares are currently in the lease pool.

Engineer Breinholt stated that once the entire secondary water system is in place and the future developments are in, the City would save 7.09 million gallons in a peak day and $12M saved by not having to acquire new wells. There will be 3.55M gallons saved in storage totaling $3.5M. There would also be significant savings by not having to upsize water lines.

The City needs 338 shares to cover the needs of the City now. It will be harder to get the water to the areas to the south and west. There would need to be more pipe put in. The total construction time for the entire system would take 2-3 years. The cost of building the system in 15 years would be higher than now because of inflation and the increased cost to do business.

Finance Director Roberts noted the City will pay more to provide the culinary water in wells, storage, and transmission than it will cost to build out the entire system at $15M. There is no guarantee the City will be able to get water rights for more culinary water. Director Fulgham will check with Bear River Canal Company about the availability of water shares.

Finance Director Roberts talked about putting in the secondary system in sections. It would be more challenging to do in sections but it could be done. The Council would like to find out if water shares are available and look at doing a bond. Councilmember Vance did not like the idea of forcing residents to hook up to secondary water. Engineer Breinholt said the City must do something now to get more water.

The cost of secondary may need to go up some. Another thing to consider is that water usage will go down when residents are using secondary water so they will not pay as much on culinary. Mayor Fridal said some places pay $200 month for water. It is to the point the City has to do something.

Motion by Councilmember Vance to have Engineer Breinholt finish the study and have someone check into availability of water shares. Director Fulgham said water rights are based on first in line. Seconded by Councilmember Reese. Vote: Councilmember Doutre – aye, Councilmember Reese – aye, Councilmember Rohde – aye, Councilmember Vance – aye. Motion approved.

b. Discussion of Capital Projects for the 2018 Budget and other matters pertaining to the adopting of the Final Budget for Fiscal Year 2018 – City Staff

Manager Warnke noted that Councilmember Rohde put together a spreadsheet that worked as a great template to add to. Director Christensen put a lot of work in to the spreadsheet as well. It is broken down into funds and has criteria on the tabs. Manager Warnke included funding sources for the projects. There are notes showing where interfund loans go and where they come from. Finance Director Roberts noted State Law requires interfund loans to have repayment terms and interest.

Manager Warnke said the priority for Fund 40 is the Main Street Drainage project, then the Streets project at $500K with $300K programmed in the General Fund to do the full amount, Senior Center Roof, Generators for Food Pantry and Senior Center (paid with a grant), and paving of Parks office. After the projects are complete, it will leave $90K in Fund 40.

Councilmember Rohde thanked Manager Warnke for the work on the spreadsheet. It shows priority and scores for ranking. It turned out great. Councilmember Reese wondered if the City could reduce the percentage in the General Fund. Finance Director Roberts said the Council can use more funds and reduce the money in the General Fund. It should never go below 10-15%.

Manager Warnke noted the Tremont Center developer has submitted costs of $1M so the first $1M of tax increment is committed to repaying developer for costs. The fund balance will transfer $75K to RDA Fund 71, and $300K to Fund 42 for street improvements. The remaining fund balance will be split 50/50 to Fund 40 and Fund 41. The City can advance contributions to the RDA if more is needed for projects before receipt of tax increment. If tax increment is available in the future, it could be repaid to the City. It would not be a loan. The public hearing and approval of final budget is scheduled for June 20.

9. Reports and Comments

a. City Manager Reports and Comments

b. City Department Head Reports and Comments

c. Council Reports and Comments

Councilmember Rohde said City staff did a great job on the pedestrian crossing lights. Director Fulgham noted the crossing on 400 West is still in the process. The camera for City Council should be up by the end of June.

The Council did not move into closed session at this time.

10. CLOSED SESSION:

a. Strategy session to discuss the purchase of real property when public discussion of the transaction would disclose the appraisal or estimated value of the property under consideration or prevent the public body from completing the transaction on the best possible terms
b. Session to discuss the mental health, character, and competence of an individual

11. Adjournment.

Motion by Councilmember Rohde to adjourn the meeting. Motion seconded by Councilmember Doutre. Vote: Councilmember Doutre – aye, Councilmember Reese – aye, Councilmember Rohde – aye, Councilmember Vance – aye. Motion approved.

The meeting adjourned at 8:41 p.m.

The undersigned duly acting and appointed Recorder for Tremonton City Corporation hereby certifies that the foregoing is a true and correct copy of the minutes for the City Council Meeting held on the above referenced date. Minutes were prepared by Deputy Recorder Cynthia Nelson.

Dated this 6th day of June, 2017.
Linsey Nessen, City Recorder